The Good-Service Test – How to Instantly Tell if You’re Going to Get Good Service

So this little litmus test for finding out instantly if you’re going to get a good service from a business actually stems from a serious look we took into the world of online businesses and income opportunities, most of which as you might know promise a whole lot but grossly under-deliver. Since business in the online space really is just an extension of business practices and principles as they exist in the physical world, it wasn’t long before we realised that we could apply the same good-service litmus test to any “offline” offering in addition to the many opportunities floating around cyberspace.

So how then do you instantly tell whether or not you’re going to be getting a good service?

Well it isn’t a black and white thing – there are a lot of grey areas falling somewhere in between, but generally the good-service test is not that difficult to run and if you practice its implementation in line with every buying decision you’re faced with, it’ll very quickly become second-nature to you and you’ll be able to do it without thinking too much about anything.

Marketing & advertising method employed

This is often the only tell-tale sign you’ll need to be able to determine whether or not a product or service you’re considering buying will give you the value for money you really need, or rather the type of value for money which is fair. It’s not a matter of this prevailing over everything else, but if you come across a product or service via word-of-mouth, that’s the ultimate indication that it’s a good deal. Satisfied customers are more than willing to share their delight in uncovering a good deal, especially with those closest to them, so if you perhaps notice some excessive promotion through channels such as Google AdWords, chances are the product or service offering sits at the other end of the scale.

Of course as mentioned, this is not gospel, so there are indeed some service providers who do things differently and still offer a great service. It is a very good indicator though, working out nine out of ten times.

A close look at the indicated value point

The legal field is perhaps a great example to go with in driving this point home. Have you ever been left feeling like you’re about to be taken for a long and expensive ride by some legal professionals who are very vague about the service they offer and perhaps even vaguer about how much it’ll cost? On the flip side of that is a good indicator of whether or not you’re going to get a good service, such as when a group of lawyers immediately brings to your attention the core service they offer and the results they’re offering, such as social security and disability attorneys who offer free consultation.

The free consultation would indicate that they want to gauge the strength of your case and this suggests a remuneration-for-results type of set up which can often be found in any customer-service provider relationship.

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